Craft Fairs Can Be Unpredictable

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Over the last few weeks I have been reading a lot of comments about people attending their first craft fair as a seller, or just selling at craft fairs in general and a lot of the same comments are coming up. People are not selling as much as they expect to.

Something I think really needs to be remembered is that Craft Fairs are UNPREDICTABLE.

Attending events as a stallholder/seller is a constant learning curve and is ever changing in the best way we can do things.

Personally, I feel that is is very important to have your business name visible on display and eye-catching so people see and remember it.

A lot of the time people browse these events with no intention of buying so if you can grab their interest then you then have the chance of them coming to you in the future when they are looking for something you sell.

I see craft fairs as a great marketing tool – people who attend craft fairs are, more often than not, interested in handmade goods so they are largely our target market. If I was to pay for an advert in a magazine for example, then there may only be a small percentage of readers interested in handmade goods.

I definitely think that adding a variation of height in your display is a great benefit as it helps to draw people in, as does having bright colours, unusual textures and designs and a display which looks suited to the season of the event eg. Christmas, Easter, Summer.

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To me, if a lot of your products blend in to your chosen colour of table cover… I would consider a change to choose a contrasting colour of table cover to give your products maximum impact in standing out against it – I know I am more inclined to stop if something catches my eye than if everything seems to be blending together colour-wise.

Also, in the past a lot of the events we have attended, it has been specified by the organiser that the table cloth must cover the front and sides of the table to floor level as it looks neater, all stalls look more uniform in this and anything stored under the table is not visible. We find this really useful as we can keep our storage boxes, carrier bags, extra stock, snacks and drinks, etc under the table while knowing they are out of sight of potential customers.

Having attended craft fairs with our handcrafted products for over seven years we are now more selective about the events we attend – in the beginning we would attend every event we could afford or fit in the diary but over time we learned which areas, types of events, etc work for us.

If we go to a “Craft and Gift Fair”, “School/Church Fayre” etc we know to expect a mix of handmade, Bodyshop, Usborne books, Phoenix cards, etc as well as some tabletop sale type of things and a lot of the time the handmade stalls are not really monitored so there is a lot of duplication.

We have learned over the years that “Craft Extravaganza”, “Craft Fair”, “Handmade Market” type of events are far better for us as people who attend know what to expect, the stalls are 99% crafters and most crafters are very supportive of each other.

At ‘proper’ Craft Fairs the number of duplicated crafts is usually very low as the organiser wants to have as much variety as possible available for their customers and visitors as well as giving everyone a fair chance of selling on the day.

The worst thing which can happen for as a seller at any event is to arrive and find out of the twenty stalls in attendance there are five of the same type of thing eg. handmade jewellery or handmade cards.

I would also say that when you are booking a stall it is vitally important to ask the organiser questions, eg.

* What is the expected footfall at the event?

* Where is the event being advertised?

* How many of each ‘type’ of stall is being allowed?

* What size table will be supplied?

* What are the opening and closing times for the event?

* What time is the venue open for us to begin setting up our stall?

* How long is allowed at the end of the day for packing away?

These are my main questions when looking at an event but there are often many other things to consider and as you get used to attending events you will compile your own set of ‘standard’ questions for event organisers.

Something else to consider is when the event is being held. We no longer attend craft fairs after the last weekend in November or first weekend in December as we learned through our experiences that people usually have made their main purchases by this time and from the middle of December onwards we never do well at events as a lot of visitors are there to browse (or get in out of the cold lol).

As a stallholder it is also important that you advertise the event where you can, whether that be on social media, your local shops, a poster in your car, your business newsletter or even a small note in with orders you post leading up to the event.  It is also useful to have a list of future events you are attanding printed on flyers that potential customers can take away with them too.

The main thing to remember is that the organiser can advertise in every way and everywhere possible, they can get people to visit the venue but nobody can control the amount of money (if any) people are willing to spend. This varies from day to day and from event to event.

Regardless of how you feel on the day, even if you are making no sales and feel like giving up, it is important to always try to engage with visitors to the event as they pass/stop at your stall – even if it’s just a friendly ‘hello’ or a comment about the weather. Anything to start the conversation flowing as people are more likely to stop at a stall where they feel that the seller is approachable.

Sometimes it is difficult to remain positive and smiley throughout the day, sometimes we feel like giving up and going home but just remember that you never know if that one big sale is just around the corner, or going to come in five minutes before the event closes.

Positivity is key – if you are friendly and approachable on the day then it is more likely that a potential customer will contact you after the event if their buying circumstances change and they find themselves in the market to buy the items you sell.

🎄 Happy selling, have a wonderful Christmas and here’s to a crafty 2017!!! 🎄

Love from Laura and Dan

Cards And Candles For All Occasions

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One comment on “Craft Fairs Can Be Unpredictable

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